German
01/01
Hamish Fulton, Mankingholes on the pennine Way, 1973
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Urban nature

Within the city an especially large number of manifestations get placed within the category of ‘nature’. The differentiation of ‘greens’ distinguishes various types of nature. Thus we can speak, on the one hand, of spontaneous vegetation occurring in places that have been changed by human activity, and on the other, of vegetation that is deliberately designed by humans. Precisely within the city, these various manifestations can be read and used as design material based on their context and juxtaposition. Since antiquity our relationship to nature in urban space has been a subject for discussion, and expression through planting concepts. The use of plants in the city calls for an understanding of the basic conditions necessary for plant growth (soil, water, light, climate, etc.). This may mean either ensuring that such conditions prevail, or making creative use of any possible inadequacies, such as soil contamination due to industrial activity. As a result, the process of examining natural phenomena has itself become an important subject within the field of urban nature: design processes incorporate phenomena such as wind, rain, growth, erosion and fallowing into the creation of parks, gardens, courtyards, squares and promenades.

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Hyperculturality
Urban nature
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